Gold foil cake accents

When it comes to cake decorating the only thing I like more than fancy is easy. When we combine fancy with easy – then I am really happy. Edible gold leaf is super duper fancy (think anniversaries and golden birthdays). It’s also crazy easy, allowing you to look fabulous without the all the work. From start to finish, decorating this cake only takes about 15 minutes.

Gold foil cake accents

To use the gold foil accents, start with an already iced cake. Chill the cake to set the icing – this allows the gold leaf to adhere well.

Gold leaf sticks to everything and anything except for bamboo, so be sure to use wood (not plastic) toothpicks when working with the leafing. Try not to touch the gold leaf. Instead hold the wafer like tissue paper it is attached to and use the toothpick to gently remove the flecks. Apply along the the edging of the cake for a gorgeously fancy gilded effect.

How to use gold foil for decorating cakes

If you have an extra 5 minutes you can add a few geometric cutouts to the top of the cake.

Roll out white fondant to about a ¼ thick and cut out desired shapes. We used a fun arrowhead shape and a few circles to complete the look. Allow the fondant to dry while you mix desired colors of luster dust. Don’t let luster dust intimidate you it is just a fancy way of saying powdered food dye. Think of it as eye shadow for fondant, and much like the gold leaf it helps you look like a rock star in the decorating department.

You can apply the dust with a big fluffy paint brush to your fondant shapes. A dry application will give a softer appearance and again think eye shadow here- blend, blend, blend. When you mix the luster dust with a little bit of alcohol (gin, vodka or even lemon extract works) it creates a paint like consistency and gives a more intense finish.

Gold foil cake accents

This cake with gold leaf and fondant attached can stay in the fridge for up to 3 days. Just enough time to find that perfect cocktail dress and present a cake your favorite people will love.

(Cake design and photography by Hilary Freeman for A Subtle Revelry)